Course Descriptions - Graduate

Below, you will find a list of some of the graduate courses and seminars with African content offered in the recent past. This list is by no means exhaustive, and you are invited to browse individual departments' graduate programs to view a more complete listing of courses.

Sample Graduate Courses:

2015
  • History 585: Special Topics in History: Nations and Identities, Lesser and Teixeira
  • History 564: Africa & Era of Slave Trade, Mann  
2014
  • ANT 585: Development and Change, Little 
2013
  • History 585: Law & History in Colonial Cultures in the Atlantic World, Mann and Yannakakis
  • History 567: Research Methods in African History, Mann 
2012 2011
  • History 567: Research Methods in African History, Mann 
2010 2009
  • AFS 585: Modern Empire & Its Dissolutions , Crais (Spring)
  • AFS 585: Coerced Labor in the Atlantic World , Eltis (Spring)
2008
  • AFS 585: Gender Violence, Gender Justice , Scully (Fall)
  • AFS 789: Colonial and Postcolonial Theories of African Art ,Kasfir (Fall)
  • AFS 789: The Ethnographic Object: Critical Issues of Collection and Display , Kasfir, Taplin-Stephenson (Spring)
  • AFS 790: Gender, Generations and Power in Africa , Bay (Spring)
  • WS 751: Feminist Theory: Human Rights and Genocide ,Scully (Spring)
2007
  • AFS 790: Religion and Politics in Africa , Bay (Fall)
  • ANTH 506: Culture and Power , Kratz (Spring)
  • HIST 567: Research Methods in African History , Mann (Spring)
  • ILA 782: Proposal Writing and Research Design in the Humanities ,Karp and Kratz (Spring)
  • WS 751 R: Feminist Theory: Human Rights and Genocide ,Scully (Spring)
2006
  • AFS 566: African Historiographies , Jezequel (Fall)
  • AFS 589: African Art & Architecture Since 1500: Postcolonial African Art , Kasfir (Fall)
  • AFS 789: Islamic African Art and Architecture , Kasfir (Fall)
  • AFS 790: Gender and Generations in Africa , Bay (Fall)
  • HIST 585: Forced Labor in the Atlantic World , Eltis (Fall)
  • WS 585: Heterographies: Histories of Self and Other , Crais, Scully (Fall)
  • AFS 789: Yoruba History, Culture and Aesthetics , Kasfir, Mann (Spring)
  • ANT 506: Culture and Power , Kratz (Spring)
  • ARTHIST 575: Modernism and Ethnography , Poling, Kasfir (Spring)
  • HIST 585: Empires Past and Present , Crais, Ravina (Spring)
2005
  • ARTHIST 565: Postcolonial African Art , Kasfir (Fall)
  • HIST 566: African Historiography , Crais (Fall)
  • HIST 585: Special Topics in History: Re-Peopling of the Americas, 1492-1917 , Eltis (Fall)
  • ARTHIST 789: Transforming Objects: From Colonial Specimen to Global Commodity , Kasfir (Spring)
  • ILA 790: Witchcraft, Oracles and Heroes in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa , Bay, Blakely (Spring)
  • WS 585: Special Topics in Women's Studies: Indigenous Women and the Making of the Atlantic World , Scully (Spring)
2004
  • HIST 585: Historiographies of Africa , Crais (Fall)
  • ILA 790: Gender and Generations: Explorations in Power in Africa ,Bay (Fall)
  • WS 585: Race, Gender & Sexuality in Post-Colonial Cultures ,Scully (Fall)
  • ARTHIST 789: Beyond the Post-Colonial , Kasfir (Spring)
  • HIST 567: Research Methods in African History , Mann (Spring)
2001
  • HIST 564: Africa: The Era of the Slave Trade , Mann (Spring)
1999
  • HART 789: Yoruba Art and Ritual , Kasfir (Spring)
  • HIST 564: Africa and the Era of the Slave Trade , Mann (Spring)
  • ILA 790 : Gender and Generations: Explorations in Power in West Africa , Bay (Spring)
  • ILA 790: Exhibiting Cultures / Performing Cultures , Karp & Kratz (Spring)
1998
  • HIST 567: Research Methods in African History , Mann (Spring)
  • RLE 740: Islam & Politics: Constitutional and Human Rights Perspectives , An-Na'im (Spring)

HIST 564-000: Africa & Era of Slave Trade (Spring 2015)

Mann

Content: This course focuses on the history of selected African societies from the sixteenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries. It will begin with an examination of the Atlantic slave trade and its impact on Africa and return intermittently to these subjects. The primary goal, however, is to study the political, economic, social, and cultural history of a number of peoples who participated in the Atlantic slave trade or were touched by it during the era of their involvement. The course is designed to serve both as a colloquium on the pre-colonial history of West and West-central Africa and as an introduction to the history and culture of African peoples who entered the diaspora during the era of the slave trade. Its audience is students interested in the history of Africa, the African diaspora, and the Atlantic world, as well as those who want to learn about the history of the slave trade. Case studies will include the Yoruba, Akan, and Fon, as well as Senegambian and West-central African peoples.

top of page


HIST 585-003: Special Topics in History: Nations and Identities (Spring 2015)

Lesser and Teixeira

Content: This graduate seminar focuses on a comparative study of Lusophone Africa, Brazil, and Portugal, from the end of World War II to today. By focusing on the so-called Afro-Luso-Brazilian triangle we will explore the multidirectional exchanges of people, memories, ideas and goods in these three continents. Selected literary, cultural, historical, anthropological and religious texts, along with films and music, will serve as vehicles for analysis of major political and social shifts that have affected the landscape of the contemporary Portuguese-speaking world and beyond: from Brazil’s military dictatorship to its transition to democracy; from Portugal’s New State to membership in the European Union; and from the wars of independence in Africa to the formation of newly independent nations. We will examine a variety of topics relating to memory, trauma and war including the formation of national, local and individual identities, gender and family dynamics, generational change, rural and urban relationships, migration and diaspora, and race and ethnic relations.

top of page


ANT 585-00P [8403]: Development and Change (2014)

TU, 4-7pm, Peter Little

Content: ‘Development’ is a highly contested field that has attracted considerable scholarly and applied interest in anthropology and other social sciences. This course examines anthropological and social science contributions to understandings of development and underdevelopment and addresses the different theories, critiques, and "schools" of development studies; social science research on selected themes of development; and the institutional actors (international development agencies, non-government organizations, and governments) that shape the discourse and activities of development. The course is intended to cover both the theoretical and policy aspects of development anthropology and to challenge the student to think critically about development problems and the narratives that inform policy and development processes.

top of page


HIST 567-000: Research Methods in African Studies (Fall 2013)

Mann

Content: This course is designed to train students in research methods used in studying African history, society, and culture. It is intended to give students practical experience with challenges they will face designing and conducting effective research in Africa. In addition to reading books and articles that employ different methods, students will gain experience working with a range of sources: archival, oral, ethnographic, and photographic.

top of page


HIST 585-001: Law & History in Colonial Cultures in the Atlantic World (Spring 2013)

Mann and Yannakakis

Content: How did law shape everyday life in colonial societies in the Atlantic World? How did legal institutions develop through imperial expansion and cultural and linguistic contact? How did the law facilitate colonial domination, and in what ways did it allow colonized peoples to pursue their own objectives? How did colonial legal encounters shape property regimes and labor systems, including slavery and domestic production? How can the study of law illuminate the negotiation of politics, identity, and memory in colonial societies? By investigating such matters, what new can we learn about gender? This course examines these large questions comparatively, focusing on the cases of Latin America and Africa. We encourage students to think not only about specific histories, but also about the sources and methods at play in historical studies of law and society.

top of page


HIST 566: African Historiography (Fall 2012)

W, 1:00 - 4:00pm, Crais

Content: The primary goal of this seminar is to work towards a critical understanding of, and engagement with, how various publics have emerged around imagining the African past. We will explore the conceptual practices shaping historical production, the ways scholars have framed and reframed questions on and about the past. An important challenge will be to work towards envisioning unexpected questions, unanticipated histories. A secondary goal of the seminar is to prepare advanced students preparing for field exams and who anticipate researching and teaching about Africa. While focused especially on the past, the seminar is in essence interdisciplinary, though we will have occasion to consider what is meant, and what is left unsaid, by the word discipline.

top of page


AFS 585: Modern Empire & Its Dissolutions (Spring 2009)

SAME AS HIST 585

W, 1:00 - 4:00pm, Crais

Content: This course will examine debates and research problems relating especially to the dissolution of empire in modern world history. The seminar makes no attempt at being comprehensive. Rather, the major challenge will be to think about: the making and unmaking of empires; the colonial and post-colonial state; and problems of violence and identity.

Texts: 1. Frantz Fanon,The Wretched of the Earth 2. Frederick Cooper,Colonialism in Question 3. Frederick Cooper, Decolonization and African Society 4. P. Duara, Decolonization: Perspectives from Now and Then 5. Wm. Roger Louis, Ends of British Imperialism 6. Benedict Anderson,Imagined Communities 7. Mahmood Mamdani, Citizen and Subject 8. Marnia Lazreg, Torture and the Twilight of Empire

Particulars: Class discussion, response papers, research essay

top of page


AFS 585: Coerced Labor in the Atlantic World (Spring 2009)

SAME AS HIST 585

R, 4:00 - 7:00pm, Eltis

Content: The focus of History 585 is the rise and fall of forms of coerced labour in the Atlantic World, and their implications for Atlantic societies. The early part of the course reviews the intellectual, political, economic and epidemiological origins of the European, and especially the English drive to extract labour from other Europeans, Indians and Africans, and the explanations for the different forms taken by this coercion. Major attention is given to the emergence of slavery and the plantation system, but both the slave trade and slave systems will be examined against the backdrop of transatlantic migration and the Atlantic world as a whole. The geographic concentration is genuinely Atlantic. The main learning objective is an understanding of the role of slavery and servitude in the Atlantic world. Slavery is assessed as part of a continuum of labour regimes most of which involved elements of coercion. Topics include the origins of servitude and slavery, the European master-servant, and state-prisoner relationship in the early modern period, the origin and impact of the slave trade on four continents including the process of industrialization, the conditions of plantation life, slave resistance, the paradox of slavery and the ideology of freedom emerging simultaneously particularly in the United States, as well as the origins of racism. The final section of the course will explore the origins and consequences of attempts to eradicate the slave systems of the Atlantic basin.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

top of page


AFS 585: Gender Violence, Gender Justice (Fall 2008)

SAME AS WS 585

TU, 10:00-1:00, Scully

Content: This seminar will explore what a gendered analysis of violence and justice does to our understanding of the transitions between conflict/post-conflict and reconstruction after civil war. We will examine how a focus on womens security and womens ideas about what justice and security look like might change the conversation around conflict and post-conflict societies.

Scholars have shown that, for women, the differences between peace, conflict, and post conflict are far more attenuated than for men. War and peace, if one factors in womens experiences of sexual violence, are more part of a continuum than a disjuncture. Sexual violence and gender-discrimination in various arenas of womens lives make it crucial that we reevaluate how we approach our understanding of conflict, transitional justice, and the meanings of peace. Sustainable justice for all has to incorporate attention to the gendered dimensions of violence, of justice, of security, of human rights.

The seminar will integrate feminist analyses of sexual violence with attention to debates within international human rights law as to how to integrate womens rights into international human rights. Our analysis of gender violence will inform our attempt to grapple with what justice might look like for women. We will examine theories of gender justice as well as examine what this looks like in the processes known as transitional justice. Truth and Reconciliation commissions have become ubiquitous means of moving societies from conflict to post-conflict states. Truth commissions of one sort or another have flourished since the 1990s. At least 15 such commissions have taken place ranging from Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, El Salvador, South Africa, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Yet gender experts continue to point out the weakness of this model in addressing womens concerns. We will examine the attempts made by TRC commissions to rectify this situation. Students will have an opportunity to examine one commission in detail, depending on their geographical area of focus.

The seminar will conclude with an examination of the notions of gendered justice in societies recovering from conflict. A goal of the seminar is to see if we can, in fact, come up with recommendations for taking womens issues seriously in societies currently identified as being in a post-conflict transition. In order to accomplish this, we will be inviting speakers from outside of the academy to talk to us about their work on gender and women in conflict and post-conflict societies.

A companion workshop to this seminar, slated for Fall 2008, is being organized through Emorys Feminist Legal Theory Project. It will focus on gender and transitional justice. Students in the seminar will be expected to participate in the FLTP workshop.

In addition, in Spring 2009, ICIS is organizing a broad conference on gender violence and gender justice. That conference is intended to bring together academics, human rights experts, and activists. Participants in the seminar will be expected to attend the ICIS conference and will also have the opportunity to help plan the conference depending on their interests. The best of the 25-30 page research papers that student will write in the Fall seminar will be presented at the conference. Original research on subjects that relate to the participants personal academic interests is encouraged. One of the planned outcomes of the conference is an edited volume on the comparative study of gender justice. The best original research papers by graduate student participants will be considered for publication in this volume, along with papers by conference participants.

Texts: Possible Readings:

The readings below give a sense of what will be included as well as other books and articles from UN experts, the International Center for Transitional Justice, and others in the field of gender violence and conflict/post-conflict situations.

Helen Durham, Tracey Gurd eds., Listening to the Silences: Women and War. Martinus Nijhof Publishers, 2005.

Priscilla B. Hayner, Fifteen Truth Commissions1974 to 1994: A Comparative Study, Human Rights Quarterly, v. 16, no. 4, November 1994, pp. 597-655.

Catharine MacKinnon, Are Women Human? And Other International Dialogues. Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Press, 2006.

Sheila Meintjes et al, eds., Aftermath: Women in Post-Conflict Transformation, Zed books.

Fiona Ross, Bearing Witness: Women and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa. University of Michigan Press.

ICTJ: Truth Commissions and Gender: Principles, Policies, and Procedures. (Part of the Gender Justice Series).

Particulars: TBA

top of page


AFS 789: Colonial and Postcolonial Theories of African Art (Fall 2008)

SAME AS ARTHIST 789

TH, 9-12, Kasfir

Content: The seminar undertakes a critical discussion of two sets of theories: those developed in the colonial period to explain historical masks, figure sculpture and architecture in Africa, roughly from 1860 to 1960, and those concerning the changes in literary and artistic practice in selected African countries as they emerged from British and French colonialism after 1960. For the colonial period we will examine several strands of thought from ethnology and art history including the relation between myth and ritual, the collective unconscious and the primitive, functionalist constructions of tradition, structural analyses of masking, and the textuality of the object. In the second part of the seminar, we will juxtapose classic anticolonial texts and ideological practices with the work of artists and writers who followed, ignored or opposed their ideas. Following this we will examine the emergence of a postcolonial subjectivity in the decade following political independence. How closely does this art relate to externally generated intellectual movements which have theorized the postcolonial? And has cosmopolitanism made the postcolonial obsolete?

Texts: Readings will include E. B. Tylor, Georg Schweinfurth, Leo Frobenius, Carl Einstein, Vladimir Markov, Paul Guillaume, Alain Locke, Marcel Griaule, Germaine Dieterlen, Warren dAzevedo, Herbert Cole, Christopher Tilley, Wole Soyinka, Malek Alloula, Okwui Enwezor and others.

Particulars: Requirements: Weekly discussions of readings and a research paper of substantial length.

top of page


AFS 790: Gender, Generations and Power in Africa (Spring 2008)

SAME AS ILA 790 HIST 585

WED, 4:30 - 7:30, Bay

Content: An increasing number of scholars over the past two decades have suggested that key social, economic and political tensions in Africa lie in the struggles between older men on the one hand and younger men and women on the other. Martin Chanock, for example, has shown how in the early colonial period elder males worked with colonial authorities to invent and codify customary law that would re-establish their control over women and younger men. John Lonsdale has eloquently described the vertical ties that link household-level struggles between generations and genders to national and global questions. Several scholars have worked to theorize such tensions, while others have augmented understandings of gender and generation through studies of African masculinities and femininities. This seminar will explore generational and gender conflict through a combination of case studies drawn from a wide range of settings, some historical and some contemporary.

Texts: Authors read will include Lynn M. Thomas, Martin Chanock, Barbara M. Cooper, Richard A. Schroeder, John Lonsdale, Belinda Bozzoli, Kenda Mutongi, and John Wood, among others.

Particulars: TBA

top of page


WS 751: Feminist Theory: Human Rights and Genocide (Spring 2008)

TBA, TBA, Scully

Content: This course will examine feminist theory relating to human rights and genocide. Themes we will pursue are the history of theorizing about women, gender and human rights; gendering our understanding of genocide, and the recognition of rape of women as a war crime. We will examine Rwanda as a case study of gender and genocide.

Texts: Readings will include: Marjorie Agosin, ed. Women, Gender, and Human Rights: A Global Perspective . ( New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press, 2001). Elizabeth Heger Boyle, Female Genital Cutting: Cultural Conflict in the Global Community . Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002. ISBN 0801870631 Adam Jones, Gender and Genocide , selections. In addition to other secondary sources, we will also read primary documents from Human Rights Watch, Amnesty, and Madre, the international human rights organization.

Particulars: **Please note: this course is not officially cross-listed with African Studies but does feature Africa-related content and may be of interest to African Studies students. 1) A weekly paragraph formulating a critical issue for discussion 2) Provide an extra article for class to read. 3) Active and informed participation in seminar discussions 4) An 18-25 page seminar paper or state of the field essay (due end of the semester)

top of page


AFS 790: Religion and Politics in Africa (Fall 2007)

SAME AS IDS 790HIST

TH, 1:00pm - 4:00pm, Bay

Content: Content: For further information on this course, please refer to the following web-site: http://www.college.emory.edu/current/courses/atlas/fall.html

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

top of page


ANTH 506: Culture and Power (Spring 2007)

M, 12:00pm - 3:00pm, Kratz

Content: This course examines how power relations shape and take form through social interaction and explores the diverse cultural resources and understandings involved in these processes. As a graduate core course, it covers basic concepts and modes of analysis in cultural anthropology by considering different sites and sources of power in social life. Ethnographic case studies will be included. Some familiarity with cultural anthropology or similar background is highly desirable, but not required. As the course will take an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, students from other departments are encouraged to enroll. The course may include lectures from visiting scholars.

Texts: Readings are still to be confirmed. Material might include: 'Between Speech and Silence'(Gal), 'How Is Society Possible?' (Simmel),Reworking Modernity(Watts and Pred), Cholera Tales (Briggs & Mantini),Europe and the People Without History (Wolf), The Ones That are Wanted: Communication and the Politics of Representation in a Photographic Exhibition (Kratz), In the Shadow of the Oracle (Van Velzen)

Particulars: Requirements: Engaged participation, careful critical reading, short reaction papers, longer papers.

**Please note: this course is not officially cross-listed with African Studies but does feature Africa-related content and may be of interest to African Studies students.

top of page


HIST 567: Research Methods in African History (Spring 2007)

SAME AS AFS 567

W, 1:00-4:00pm, Mann

Content: This course is designed to train students in research methods used in studying African history and culture. It is intended to give students practical experience with challenges they will face designing and conducting effective research in Africa. In addition to reading books and articles that employ different methods, students will gain experience working with a range of sources: archival, oral, ethnographic, photographic, and possibly material.

Texts: Readings may include the following: Cooper, On the African Waterfront; White, Comforts of Home; More, Social Facts and Fabrications; Mann and Roberts, Law in Colonial Africa; Gordon, Picturing Bushmen; Marks, Not Either an Experimental Doll; Finnegan, Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts; Vansina, Oral Tradition as History; Berry, Fathers Work for their Sons; Bozzoli, Women of Phokeng.

Particulars: In addition to doing the readings and making oral presentations, each student will be expected to write a major research proposal in the course. If students have chosen dissertation topics, they will be encouraged to define proposals related to them.

top of page


ILA 782: Proposal Writing and Research Design in the Humanities (Spring 2007)

SAME AS HIST 585SPAN 797

W, 1:00pm - 4:00pm, Karp and Kratz

Content: This course has two goals: 1) to help students formulate clear, focused dissertation research projects with appropriate humanistic research methodologies and 2) to train students in the preparation and presentation of their research projects in formats such as outside funding applications and dissertation proposals. Students will be involved in analyzing research methods and critiquing draft proposals for grants.

Texts: Texts include: The Craft of Research (Booth, Williams & Colomb),A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature (Labor, Guerin et al.),Qualitative Research Design: An Interactive Approach (Maxwell)

Particulars: **Please note: this course is not officially cross-listed with African Studies but does feature Africa-related content and may be of interest to African Studies students.

Although practical logistical considerations have limited the number of departments that can be cross-listed for this course, the seminar is open to students in all humanities departments, and to students in any department whose research focuses on humanistic issues. It is best taken in the second or third year of coursework, when students are beginning to formulate dissertation research projects and to draft grant proposals.

top of page


WS 751 R: Feminist Theory: Human Rights and Genocide (Spring 2007)

T, 9:00 - 12:00, Scully

Content: This course will examine feminist theory relating to human rights and genocide. Themes we will pursue are the history of theorizing about women, gender and human rights; gendering our understanding of genocide, and the recognition of rape of women as a war crime. We will examine Rwanda as a case study of gender and genocide.

Texts: Readings will include: Marjorie Agosin, ed. Women, Gender, and Human Rights: A Global Perspective . ( New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press, 2001).

Elizabeth Heger Boyle, Female Genital Cutting: Cultural Conflict in the Global Community . Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002. ISBN 0801870631

Adam Jones, Gender and Genocide , selections.

In addition to other secondary sources, we will also read primary documents from Human Rights Watch, Amnesty, and Madre, the international human rights organization.

Particulars: **Please note: this course is not officially cross-listed with African Studies but does feature Africa-related content and may be of interest to African Studies students.

1) A weekly paragraph formulating a critical issue for discussion 2) Provide an extra article for class to read. 3) Active and informed participation in seminar discussions 4) An18-25 page seminar paper or state of the field essay (due end of the semester)

top of page


AFS 566: African Historiographies (Fall 2006)

SAME AS HIST 566

W, 1:00-4:00 pm, Jezequel

Content: This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the study and writing of African history. Students will identify and interrogate the main schools of thought in African historiography. The course will explore the kinds of questions scholars have asked about the African past, the relationship between history and other disciplines, particularly anthropology, and the emergence of new approaches to African history over the past two decades.

Texts: Readings may include: Jan Vansina, Paths in the Rain Forest; Emmanuel Akyeampong, Drink, power, and cultural change; Frederick Cooper, Decolonization and African Society; Mahmood Mamdani, Citizen and Subject;Johannes Fabian, Out of our Minds; Derek Peterson,Creative Writing.

Particulars: Several one-page essays, one research paper.

top of page


AFS 589: African Art & Architecture Since 1500: Postcolonial African Art (Fall 2006)

SAME AS ARTHIST 589

TTH, 10:00-11:15, Kasfir

Content: Content: This course introduces students to the visual and performing arts of Africa with primary emphasis on sculpture, vernacular architecture and arts of the body. These will be examined in their religious, social and political milieu, and not merely as object of western connoisseurship. The first part of the course will examine major aspects of African art, such as ritual setting, performance, patronage, style, history, technology and social meaning. The second part will consist of several case studies of art in contrasting cultural and environmental settings in different parts of the continent.

Texts: Reserve readings, films, videos and at least one African novel.

Particulars: This is a graduate lecture course to run concurrently with ARTHIST 365/AFS 365, but with a separate weekly tutorial for graduate students only. This, at a time to be arranged, will meet informally to discuss readings in greater depth and at the end of the semester to give individual presentations on research papers.

top of page


AFS 789: Islamic African Art and Architecture (Fall 2006)

SAME AS ARTHIST 789

T, 4:00-7:00 pm, Kasfir

Content: In Africa the Sahara has been both barrier and bridge to the spread of Islam. Its ancient trade routes , along with those of the Indian Ocean , have brought goods, technology and styles from Islamic cutures into already established African kingdoms. The course focuses on two broad topics: the first is mosque, palace and domestic architecture in West ( Mali and Nigeria) and East (Kenya and Tanzania ) Africa , from the 10th to 19th century. We will consider not only architectural design in relation to local vernacular styles but also the 'social maps and ground rules' of its use of space and seclusion. The second major topical focus is Islamic personal art: dress, ornament, and comportment within the accepted hierarchies of class and gender. As with architecture, major transformations took place in response to jihad, slavery and colonization.

Texts: ( on reserve) Bourgeois, Spectacular Vernacular; Moughtin,Hausa Architecture; Prussin, Hatumere ; Ardener, (Jane Katib-Chahidi),Women and Space ; Kirkman, Men and Monuments of the East African Coast; Horton and Middleton, The Swahili; Middleton, The World of the Swahili; Fuglesang, Veils and Videos; others

Particulars: This is a graduate lecture course to run concurrently with ARTHIST 485AFS 389, but with a separate weekly tutorial for graduate students only. This, at a time to be arranged, will meet informally to discuss readings in greater depth and at the end of the semester to give individual presentations on research papers.

top of page


AFS 790: Gender and Generations in Africa (Fall 2006)

SAME AS ILA 790HIST 585

M, 1:00 -4:00 pm, Bay

Content: An increasing number of scholars over the past two decades have suggested that key social, economic and political tensions in Africa lie in the struggles between older men on the one hand and younger men and women on the other. Martin Chanock, for example, has shown how in the early colonial period elder males worked with colonial authorities to invent and codify customary law that would re-establish their control over women and younger men. John Lonsdale has eloquently described the vertical ties that link household-level struggles between generations and genders to national and global questions. Several scholars have worked to theorize such tensions, while others have augmented understandings of gender and generation through studies of African masculinities and femininities. This seminar will explore generational and gender conflict through a combination of case studies drawn from a wide range of settings, some historical and some contemporary.

Texts: Authors read will include Lynn M. Thomas, Martin Chanock, Barbara M. Cooper, Richard A. Schroeder, Oyeronke Oyewumi, John Lonsdale, Benedict Carton, Belinda Bozzoli, Margot Lovett, Kenda Mutongi, and John Wood, among others.

Particulars: TBA

top of page


HIST 585: Forced Labor in the Atlantic World (Fall 2006)

TH, 1:00-4:00 pm, Eltis

Content: The focus of History 585 is the rise and fall of forms of coerced labour in the Atlantic World, and their implications for Atlantic societies. The early part of the course reviews the intellectual, political, economic and epidemiological origins of the European, and especially the English drive to extract labour from other Europeans, Indians and Africans, and the explanations for the different forms taken by this coercion. Major attention is given to the emergence of slavery and the plantation system, but both the slave trade and slave systems will be examined against the backdrop of transatlantic migration and the Atlantic world as a whole. The geographic concentration is genuinely Atlantic. The main learning objective is an understanding of the role of slavery and servitude in the Atlantic world. Slavery is assessed as part of a continuum of labour regimes most of which involved elements of coercion. Topics include the origins of servitude and slavery, the European master-servant, and state-prisoner relationship in the early modern period, especially in England, the origin and impact of the slave trade on four continents including the process of industrialization, the conditions of plantation life, slave resistance, the paradox of slavery and the ideology of freedom emerging simultaneously particularly in the United States, as well as the historical origins of racism. The final section of the course will explore the origins and consequences of attempts to eradicate the slave system in the Atlantic basin, with particular reference to Britain. For Africa this means examining interpretations of the shift to the trade in commodities in place of the slave trade, and the origin of colonial partition.

Texts: The seminar topics listed in the following outline are each accompanied by a list of readings.

If you want an early flavour of the subject you could spend two or three hours with the following three short readings: Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study (Cambridge Ma., 1982), pp. 1-13. Marietta Morrissey, Slave Women in the New World (Lawrence, 1989), pp. 1-17, HT1071.M656. Robert W. Fogel, The Slavery Debates, 1952-1990 (Baton Rouge, 2003).

Otherwise, jump right in. I have assigned less than 200 pages for most weeks, because the reading is occasionally difficult. I would therefore expect every student to read everything assigned. At times during the semester (not before the third week) students should prepare and hand in a short report on the topics explored during the session.

Particulars: (a) Major Research Paper. All students are responsible for one major research paper of about 20 pages due December 9. This could use one of the seminar themes as a starting off point, but students are free to choose any topic - subject of course to prior approval. There are a number of easily accessible primary sources which students could use - a long private journal of a Jamaican slave owner with detailed discussion of slaves, various collections in the Woodruff, a data set of rebellions on slave ships on which students might wish to draw, though it should be stressed that a suitably fashioned historiographical essay is acceptable.

(b) Seminar reports. During the year students will be expected to write seven short seminar reports on the topics explored during the session (six to count). These should be handed within two days of the seminar itself and should be no more than three pages long. Students should aim to summarise critically the major themes - rather than readings - for the session and briefly offer a response to the major positions under discussion. The distribution of marks is as follows: 45 percent for the major essay, 45 percent seminar reports, 10 percent, class participation.

top of page


WS 585: Heterographies: Histories of Self and Other (Fall 2006)

SAME AS HIST 585

T, 9:00 am -12:00 pm, Crais, Scully

Content: This seminar investigates the centrality of ideas of the self and of agency to historical research and writing. It particularly seeks to understand the challenges involved in writing the histories of people from cultures and positions marginal to the narratives of the self created in Europe and the United States. The seminar will work towards re-imagining the problem of agency and the recuperation of the social. How do we consider topics such as intentionality and consciousness after post-structuralism? What does it mean to speak of 'agency' in a language of private property? How do we write the histories of people such as Sara Baartman, for example, who moved through often radically different constitutions of power? We locate these and other questions in the concept of 'heterography' to denote the multiple writings of difference.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

top of page


AFS 789: Yoruba History, Culture and Aesthetics (Spring 2006)

SAME AS ARTHIST 789HIS 585

T, 1-4, Kasfir, Mann

Content: This interdisciplinary seminar will explore Yoruba history embedded in art and ritual performance and conversely, the role of expressive culture in delineating the values of political life and making claims to power and authority. Beginning with the mythic past and the early development of sacred kingship in Ile-Ife, we will trace its political and economic fortunes and the shift in power to Oyo, using the Shango cult and Egungun masquerade as historical evidence. The fall of Oyo and rise of Ibadan in the mid-19th c., accompanied by the introduction of Islam and Christian missions, will be followed by a consideration of the colonial period, cocoa production and the connections of new wealth and modes of consumption and display. The nationalist period will be viewed through the establishment of new cultural institutions such as Black Orpheus, the Mbari clubs and a Department of Antiquities. Finally in the postcolonial period we will examine the shifts toward evangelical Christianity and the rise of heritage tourism.

Texts: Readings include works by J.D.Y.Peel, Robin Law, Toyin Falola, Babatunde Lawal, Andrew Apter, Margaret Drewal, Henry Drewal, Peter Probst and Solomon Babayemi.

Particulars: In-class presentations and a research paper.

top of page


ANT 506: Culture and Power (Spring 2006)

F, 10:00am-1:00pm, Kratz

Content: This course examines how power relations shape and take form through social interaction and explores the diverse cultural resources and understandings involved in these processes. As a graduate core course, it covers basic concepts and modes of analysis in cultural anthropology by considering different sites and sources of power in social life. Ethnographic case studies will be included. Some familiarity with cultural anthropology or similar background is highly desirable, but not required. As the course will take an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, students from other departments are encouraged to enroll. The course may include lectures from visiting scholars.

Texts: Readings are still to be confirmed. Material might include: GalBetween Speech and Silence Simmel How Is Society Possible? Watts and Pred Reworking Modernity Briggs & Mantini Cholera Tales Wolf Europe and the People Without History Kratz The Ones That are Wanted: Communication and the Politics of Representation in a Photographic Exhibition Van Velzen In the Shadow of the Oracle

Particulars: Engaged participation, careful critical reading, short reaction papers, longer papers.

top of page


ARTHIST 575: Modernism and Ethnography (Spring 2006)

SAME AS ILA 790

TTH, 10:00-11:15 am, Poling, Kasfir

Content: The course explores two parallel histories of modernism in the visual arts. The first investigates the uses of ethnographic materials and perspectives by modernist artists and critics from German Expressionism and Cubism to Surrealism. This history encompasses the exposure of Europeans to the artifacts and cultures of small scale societies in Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas, as well as the parallels Europeans drew between these cultures and early civilizations and developmental stages of the individual. The other theme examines the colonial settings in which these European movements took place and the simultaneous efforts by European colonizers (particularly in sub-Saharan Africa) to capture this ethnographic eve of contact through collecting and photographic documentation while also implanting the desire for modernity as part of an emergent cultural nationalism. Conversely it also examines some of the specifically African modernisms which developed from this desire.

Texts: Readings by contemporary writers such as Bataille, Leiris, Dubuffet and by later scholars such as Goldwater, Rubin, Clifford as well as contemporary works by Enwezor, Oguibe, Okeke, Ogbechie, Kasfir and others...

Particulars: In-class presentations, two short critical papers, and a longer research paper.

top of page


HIST 585: Empires Past and Present (Spring 2006)

W, 4:00-7:00 pm, Crais, Ravina

Content: We are living, it is said, in a new age of Empire. Empires: Past and Present is an intensive seminar that critically examines theories of imperialism and the making of the modern world. We will begin broadly and conceptually by looking at various theories and definitions of empire. Much of the semester will then proceed to an examination of new developments in the study of empire and colonialism over the past two decades.The seminar is especially distinctive in two ways. First, over the course of the semester we will invite scholars to the seminar who will present pre-circulated papers that address one aspect of modern empire. Second, on March 24-25 the seminar will host a major, campus-wide roundtable on empire with featured guests such as Anne Stoler and Frederick Cooper.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Several one-page essays, one research paper.

top of page


ARTHIST 565: Postcolonial African Art (Fall 2005)

TTH, 1:00-2:15pm, Kasfir

Content: A survey of nontraditional forms of twentieth century African art which have developed in response to the colonial and missionary experience, urbanization, and the intrusion of foreign patronage. The disruptive effects of both Islam and Christianity upon precolonial art will be analyzed, along with the 'discovery' of African art by the international art market. Other topics include: art as a genre of political protest in South Africa; the development of new forms of urban popular art and their relationship to traditional art forms in rural areas; tourist or 'airport' art and the curio trade. Particular emphasis on the self-taught urban proletarian artist as well as the graduate of Western-style university art schools.

Texts: Sidney Kasfir, Contemporary African Art; Camara Laye, The Dark Child; Athol Fugard, Statements; other readings on reserve.

Particulars: Two or three 3-5 page critical papers (15% each); 3 in-class quizzes (15% each), final exam (20%); attendance and participation will count for the remaining points toward a grade for the course.

top of page


HIST 566: African Historiography (Fall 2005)

W, 1:00-4:00pm, Crais

Content: This course explores major developments in the field of African history. We will explore the kinds of questions scholars have asked about the African past, the relationship between history and other disciplines, particularly anthropology, and the emergence of new approaches to African history over the past two decades. The goals of the course are two-fold. First, we will begin developing a command of the field. Second, we will work towards understanding a particular area or region of Africa that will serve the future research and scholarly interests of individual seminar participants. Finally, the seminar is offered in conjunction with the African History Colloquium series in which leading scholars will be visiting Emory to present |pre-circulated papers of work-in-progress.

Texts: Readings may include: Vansina, Paths in the Rainforest; Mamdani, Citizen and Subject ; Miller, Way of Death; White, Speaking with Vampires; Berry, No Condition is Permanent; Cooper, Decolonization and African Society.

Particulars: Intensive discussion; short papers; research project.

top of page


HIST 585: Special Topics in History: Re-Peopling of the Americas, 1492-1917 (Fall 2005)

TH, 1:00-4:00pm, Eltis

Content: The course examines the fall and rise of the population of the Americas from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries. Comparisons will be made of free and coerced transatlantic migration and the range of social, cultural and economic factors that shaped these migrant flows. In addition, the consequences of migration for societies on both sides of the Atlantic will form an important part of the course.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

top of page


ARTHIST 789: Transforming Objects: From Colonial Specimen to Global Commodity (Spring 2005)

SAME AS ILA 790

T, 9-12, Kasfir

Content: If, as Fanon and others have argued, colonial power was able to bring about a disjuncture between representation and reality, how has this affected the perception of 'native' objects in cosmopolitan artworlds? This seminar explores the role of British colonial representation in defining and displaying African material culture as primitive art, artifact, souvenir and commodity. We will narrow the focus to two major case studies of warriorhood and its objects, one (the Idoma of central Nigeria) materialized in masquerading and the other (the Samburu of northern Kenya) in the ritualized body itself along with its symbols of masculinity found in weaponry, body arts and comportment..

Texts: TBA

Particulars: These include unpublished manuscripts, colonial fiction, popular travel accounts, colonial district reports and Hollywood films.

top of page


ILA 790: Witchcraft, Oracles and Heroes in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa (Spring 2005)

TH, 9-12, Bay, Blakely

Content: This practical experiment in comparative study focuses on three modalities of religious experience in ancient Greece and recent Africa; prophecy/spirit mediumship, heroism, and witchcraft/magic. Beginning with a consideration of empirical data, we will move to issues of evidence and method, interpretive traditions, and intellectual potential. Our data include literary and ethnographic texts, visual and archeological evidence, archival materials, and news reports. This course tests the possibilities of scholarship that is simultaneously cross-cultural and interdisciplinary and hence it explores intersections of cultures, both human and academic.

While a background in Greek or African studies is useful, we also welcome students curious about the viability of comparative and interdisciplinary projects.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

top of page


WS 585: Special Topics in Women's Studies: Indigenous Women and the Making of the Atlantic World (Spring 2005)

TH, 9:00-12:00 am, Scully

Content: This course examines the earliest contacts between indigenous societies and European explorers on the coasts of the Atlantic from the 15th through the 18th centuries. Informed by recent theoretical writing on gendering of the early American encounters, the course explores discourses and practices of gender and its operations in the early Atlantic World. We will read classic primary texts of exploration and conquest (such as Bernal Diaz's account of the conquest of Tenochtitlan) across the grain in order to uncover the experiences of relatively unknown indigenous women. We will also examine the lives and literary and historical representations of women such as Pocahontas, and Dona Marina of the Americas, and Eva of the Cape as well as women in the West African coastal towns of the early slave trade. Our goal is to understand the extent to which narratives of conquest were themselves gendered, how such representations and understandings changed over time, and the ways in which gender as a category of analysis changes our understanding of the making of the Atlantic World and of indigenous women's roles in that creation.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Students will be expected to write weekly papers, a research paper, and lead seminars.

top of page


ILA 790: Gender and Generations: Explorations in Power in Africa (Fall 2004)

F, 9-12, Bay

Content: An increasing number of scholars over the past two decades have suggested that key social, economic and political tensions in Africa lie in the struggles between older men on the one hand and younger men and women on the other. Martin Chanock, for example, has shown how in the early colonial period elder males worked with colonial authorities to invent and codify customary law that would re-establish their control over women and younger men. Several scholars have worked to theorize such tensions, while others have augmented understandings of gender and generation through studies of African masculinities and femininities. This seminar will explore generational and gender conflict through a combination of case studies drawn from a wide range of settings; a portion of the course will work on reading and working with relevant theory.

Texts: Authors read may include Lynn M. Thomas, Martin Chanock, Barbara M. Cooper, Richard A. Schroeder, Oyeronke Oyewumi, Luise White, Benedict Carton, Belinda Bozzoli, Margot Lovett, Kenda Mutongi, Claude Meillassoux, Elaine Salo, Paul Richards, Andrew Apter, Mark Auslander and John Lamphear.

Particulars: TBA

top of page


WS 585: Race, Gender & Sexuality in Post-Colonial Cultures (Fall 2004)

T, 1-4, Scully

Content: This course explores the ways in which understandings of race, gender and sexuality have been framed by, and have reshaped imperialism, colonialism and the post-colonial world. Much of the course will focus on an analysis of different theoretical interventions on the questions of gender, culture, and tradition in order to grapple with the complex legacies of the colonial era. The class will engage in ongoing discussion of the complicated relations between and within the 'colonized' and the 'colonizers' through discussion of topics such as sexuality and oppression in slave cultures; sati in 19th Century India; and campaigns against clitoridectomy in 20th Century Kenya and France.

Texts: Michel Foucault, History of Sexuality; Ann Stoler, Carnal Knowledge; Albert Memmi, The Colonizer and the Colonized; Malek Alloulah, The Colonial Harem; Lata Mani, Contentious Traditions. A number of articles will also be on electronic reserve.

Particulars: Students will write weekly essays on the reading and complete a research paper. Each student will be expected to lead a seminar.

top of page


ARTHIST 789: Beyond the Post-Colonial (Spring 2004)

SAME AS ILA 790

TBA, TBA, Kasfir

Content: Is the postcolonial now an exhausted phenomenon, both as theoretical stance and historical reality? This seminar explores critically the currently accepted approaches to African art and performance and some of the alternatives which could be culled from other disciplines such as cultural geography and the new archaeology as well as from the current empirical reality of artists' experience. While the focus will be on expressive culture since the 1950s, we will also critically reexamine accepted approaches to African art from earlier historical periods such as the 19th century, in relation to European exploration and trade as well as Islamic jihad and missionary establishment.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Weekly reading critiques and a research presentation and paper.

top of page


HIST 567: Research Methods in African History (Spring 2004)

TBA, TBA, Mann

Content: This course is designed to train students in research methods used in studying African history and culture. It is intended to give students practical experience with challenges they will face designing and conducting effective research in Africa. In addition to reading books and articles that employ different methods, students will gain experience working with a range of sources: archival, oral, ethnographic, photographic, and possibly material.

Texts: Readings may including the following: Cooper, On the African Waterfront; White, Comforts of Home; More, Social Facts and Fabrications; Mann and Roberts, Law in Colonial Africa; Gordon,Picturing Bushmen; Marks, Not Either an Experimental Doll; Finnegan,Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts; Vansina, Oral Tradition as History; Berry, Fathers Work for their Sons; Bozzoli, Women of Phokeng.

Particulars: In addition to doing the readings and making oral presentations, each student will be expected to write a major research proposal in the course. If students have chosen dissertation topics, they will be encouraged to define proposals related to them

top of page


HIST 564: Africa: The Era of the Slave Trade (Spring 2001)

TBA, TBA, Mann

Content: This course examines the transformation of selected African societies from the 15th through the mid-19th centuries. It begins by looking at the rise of plantation agriculture in the west and the origins of the Atlantic slave trade. The course moves on to investigate changes in the conduct of the slave trade and in its impact on Africa. The bulk of the material covered probes the economic, political, social and cultural history of African societies that were involved in the slave trade. The course is designed for students wanting to know more about precolonial African history, as well as for those interested in African contributions to European and New World cultures.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: TBA

top of page


HART 789: Yoruba Art and Ritual (Spring 1999)

SAME AS ANTH 586

M, 1:00-4:00pm, Kasfir

Content: This seminar will address Yoruba culture, history, visual arts and ritual performance. The seminar will begin very broadly reading history and ethnography and then narrow to cosmology, ritual and the visual and performative aspects of Yoruba culture including, at the end, a consideration of the Yoruba diaspora in Brazil, Cuba and the USA.

Texts: These include a critical reading of the literature on the Yoruba beginning with 19th century sources, such as Johnson's The History of the Yoruba, moving to Frobenius's diary Und Africka Sprach, to the classics of Yoruba studies by Peter Morton-Williams, Robin Law, Pierre Verger, Frank Willett, Wiliam Bascom, Peter and Barbara Lloyd and J. D. Y. Peel. Post-1970 readings will focus on interpretations of visual art and performance, such and Robert Farris Thompson, Rowland Abiodun, Babatunde Lawal, Henry Drewal, Margaret Thompson Drewal, John Mason, Mikelle Smith Omari and John Pemberton.

Particulars: Resarch papers and presentations will be coordinated with the Yoruba exhibition opening at the Carlos Museum on February 6.

top of page


HIST 564: Africa and the Era of the Slave Trade (Spring 1999)

TBA, TBA, Mann

Content: This course examines the transformation of selected African societies from the 15th through the mid-19th centuries. It begins by looking at the rise of plantation agriculture in the west and the origins of the Atlantic slave trade. The course moves on to investigate changes in the conduct of the slave trade and in its impact on Africa. The bulk of the material covered probes the economic, political, social and cultural history of African societies that were involved in the slave trade. The course is designed for students wanting to know more about precolonial African history, as well as for those interested in African contributions to European and New World cultures.

Texts: May include the following: Lovejoy, Transformation in Slavery; Thornton, Africa and Africans; Curtin, Economic Change in Precolonial Africa; Searing, West African Slavery and Atlantic Commerce; Klein,Slavery and Colonial Rule in French West Africa; McCaskie, State and Society in Pre-colonial Asante; Law The Oyo Empire and The Slave Coast of West Africa; Latham, Old Calabar; Northrup, Trade without Rulers; Miller, Way of Death.

Particulars: Requirements include class participation, oral presentations, two critical papers, and an annotated bibliography.

top of page


ILA 790 : Gender and Generations: Explorations in Power in West Africa (Spring 1999)

F, 9:00am-12:00pm, Bay

Content: An increasing number of scholars, over the past two decades, have suggested that key social, economic and political tensions in Africa lie in the struggles between older men on the one hand and younger men and women on the other. Martin Chanock, for example, has shown how in the early colonial period elder males worked with colonial authorities to invent and codify 'customary law' that would re-establish their control over women and younger men. This research seminar will explore generational and gender conflicts through a series of case-studies drawn from a wide range of settings and historical moments that may include the early nationalist movement in Kenya, women's formal authority in precolonial states, post-war nationalism in the Gold Coast, Muslim women's political activities in Niger, and youth warfare in contemporary Liberia and Sierra Leone. Along the way, we will ask questions about the relationships of youth culture to social institutions such as age grades or masquerade societies, about how and where women's and young men's interests intersect, and about patterns of dispute settlement between generations in differing contexts.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Students will research a region/ethnic area of their choice, posing a series of questions elicited from the case studies. The research project will be presented in written form for seminar discussion, and will be completed in the form of a 25-30 page paper.

top of page


ILA 790: Exhibiting Cultures / Performing Cultures (Spring 1999)

SAME AS HART 789

M, 10:00am-1:00pm, Karp & Kratz

Content: This seminar examines processes and issues related to creating and experiencing exhibitions about art and culture. The course emphasizes museum venues, but will also consider other forms of cultural display, such as cultural festivals, world fairs and theme parks. Topics will include the history of such displays and associated institutions, relations among museums and communities, differences among different types of museums, museums and display in crosscultural perspective, the multiple roles and perspectives that come together in creating and showing cultural displays, and diverse communicative processes involved in experiencing and interpreting them.

Texts: May include the following: Bennett, T., The Birth of the Museum; Duncan, C., Civilizing Rituals; Karp, I., and Levine, S., Exhibiting Cultures; Karp, I., Kreamer, C., and Lavine, S., Museums and Communities; Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, B., Destination Culture; Kurhin, R., Reflections of a Culture Broker; Sherman, D. and Rogoff, I., Museum Culture.

Particulars: Students will be expected to participate fully in class discussions and to lead some class discussions. The course will be conducted in association with the Center for the Study of Public Scholarship's theme for this year, 'Exhibiting Cultures -- Performing Cultures', and a number of talks, possible field trips, and a conference will be part of the content of the course itself. Written assignments willinclude reaction papers and a long analytical work.

top of page


HIST 567: Research Methods in African History (Spring 1998)

M, 1:00-4:00pm, Mann

Content: This course is designed to train students in the humanities and social sciences who plan research in Africa that is either historical or has a historical component in methods they will need for their research. In addition to reading books and articles that exemplify different historical methods, students will receive hands-on experience working with a range of materials, including archival, oral, ethnographic, linguistic, material, and photographic. The course will engage questions of appropriate research design. It will examine how the choices scholars make regarding sources and methods affect research findings and how the assumptions they bring to their data influence interpretations.

Texts: Readings assigned may including part or all of the following: F. Cooper, On the African Waterfront; R. Packard, White Plague, Black Labor; K. Mann and R. Roberts, Law in Colonial Africa; S. F. More, Social Facts and Fabrications; S. Marks, Not Either an Experimental Doll; J. Miller, The African Past Speaks; R. Finnegan, Oral Traditions and the Verbal Arts; K. Barber, I Could Speak until Tomorrow; K Mann, Marrying Well; L. White, The Comforts of Home; E. Mandala, Work and Control in a Peasant Economy; S. Berry, Fathers Work for their Sons; K. Atkins,The Moon is Dead! Give Us our Money!; B. Bozzoli, Women of Phokeng; M. Strobel, Three Swahili Women; E. Bay, Asen: Iron Alters of Dahomey; S. Kasfir, Art in History, History in Art: The Idoma Ancestral Masquerade as Historical Evidence. Students will also read substantial amounts of primary source material.

Particulars: In addition to readings and class participation, students will write a research design in the course. If students have chosen dissertation topics they will be encouraged to define projects that will advance work on their prospectuses.

top of page


RLE 740: Islam & Politics: Constitutional and Human Rights Perspectives (Spring 1998)

SAME AS LAW 280 02A

M, 2:30-5:30pm, An-Na'im

Content: This seminar will examine the relationship between Islam and politics in theological, ideological, political and legal terms, with particular focus on issues of constitutionalism and human rights. The seminar will discuss these issues form historical as well as contemporary 'modern' points of view. Themes to be covered include: classical models of an Islamic state and their implementation/roles in Islamic history, modern conceptions of constitutionalism and human rights in universalist/relativist and comparative perspectives, recent and current Muslim responses to the issues in the present national and international contexts of Muslim societies, and secularism versus unity of state and religion in Islamic and comparative perspective.

Texts: Photocopied course materials.

Particulars: TBA

top of page